SMSC


All maintained schools must meet the requirements set out in section 78 of the Education Act 2002 and promote the spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development of their pupils.  Through ensuring pupils’ SMSC development, schools can also demonstrate they are actively promoting fundamental British Values.

Promoting Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural at KPINS (SMSC)

Provision of SMSC schools should: How We Promote It
Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence.

UN CRC Article 5: Adults have the responsibility to help you learn to exercise your rights and to ensure that your rights are protected.
Article 12: Children have a right to give an opinion and for adults to listen and take it seriously.
Article 28: Children have a right to high quality education which encourages to achieve the highest level they can.


• Through RE lesson & assemblies opportunities are provided for pupils to reflect on their own beliefs, religious or otherwise, that inform their perspective on life and their interest in, and respect for, different people’s faiths, feelings and values.
• In lessons, children are encouraged to contribute, have the confidence to respond and are praised for doing so.
• Mistakes are seen as a positive they show us where we need to try harder and where we need to improve our learning.
• During circle time and other areas of the curriculum, pupils are encouraged to share their wider knowledge e.g. science, RE etc.

Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the civil and criminal law of England.

Links to school values:
Respect
Co-operation
Courage

UN CRC Article 19: Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.


• We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy. There are rewards for exhibiting good and caring behaviour and consistent demonstration of our values is recognised through such things as ‘Star of the Week’ and ‘Pupil of the Week’ awards, half termly achievement nominations & certificates.
• Through our school assemblies, circle time and PSHE children are taught how to earn trust and respect and are supported to develop a strong sense of morality; knowing right from wrong and doing the right thing even when it’s difficult.
• The local police officer / PCSO visit the school to talk to the children and explain about their role in society.
• The fire brigade visit the school to talk to the children and explain about their role in society.
• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
• We are proud to be the first Level 2 Rights Respecting Infant School to achieve this award across London.
Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and to understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality of the school and to society more widely.

UN CRC Article 15: Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.


• Through the RRSA – pupils develop an understanding of the consequences of their behaviour and actions.
• Classroom charters are based on pupil’s mutually agreed codes of practice with clear behaviour expectations.
• Dojo points are awarded for work and positive behaviour but also removed as a consequence of unacceptable actions.
• Through children deciding the charities to which fund are donated from school events.
• Through doing things for others e.g. The Annual Christmas Carol concert for people in the local community (Residence of the sheltered housing and disability centre)
Enable pupils to acquire a broad general knowledge of and respect for public institutions and services in England.

Links to school values:
Respect
Courage

UN CRC Article 31: All children have a right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of activities.

UN CRC Article 15: Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.


• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
• Through our school values and the SEAL PSHE program, children are taught about personal responsibility, choices, ambition and aspiration. They are encouraged to take opportunities to follow their interests in art, music, sport etc.
• SEAL has specific units relating to individual liberty including ‘Good To Be Me!’
• Children are taught how to keep themselves safe, including on-line (e-safety). This is done through computing lessons, assemblies and outside organisations such as the NSPCC, as well as through the PSHE curriculum.
Further tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions by enabling pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures.
Links to school values:
Respect
Tolerance/Understanding

UN CRC Article 14: Children have the right to think and believe what they want, and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide their children on these matters.


• We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy and Equality, Diversity and Cohesion Policy.
• Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs is promoted through the Syllabus for Religious Education. Children learn about different religions, their beliefs, places of worship and festivals. The children’s work on this subject or whole school learning in assemblies is often displayed in the classrooms or around the school.
• This is supplemented by assemblies (Key Stage and whole school), which also mark and celebrate significant religious festivals such as Ramadan and Diwali.
• Visits are made by local religious leaders and children have the opportunity to visit places of worship.
• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others
Encourage respect for other people

Links to school values:
Respect
Friendship
Co-operation

UN CRC Article 2: The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say and whatever type of family they come from.

UN CRC Article 30: Children have a right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether these are shared by the majority of people in the country or not.


• We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy and Single Equality Policy.
• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
• Through our school’s values, SEAL scheme, PSHE and circle time children are taught to respect each other, to be cooperative and collaborative, be supportive and to look for similarities while being understanding of differences.
• The SEAL theme of ‘Getting on and Falling Out’ explores these issues well.
• Mutual respect is also promoted through additional PSHE lessons and assemblies. A range of specific assemblies were delivered focusing on helping other pupils to understand specific special needs.
• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.
Encourage respect for democracy and support for participation in the democratic processes, including respect for the basis on which the law is made and applied in England.

UN CRC Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen, when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account.


• We have an elected School Council. This is used as an opportunity to promote and teach about democracy and the electoral process.
• We encourage volunteerism in and out of school. This includes things like the Eco-Warriors, sports/team leaders, ICT support, lunch helpers, and also raising money for local and national charities.
• The beginnings of democracy are taught by providing a range of opportunities/situations for the children to make decision/choices from EYFS through to end of KS 1(Thinking skills, RRSA).
• Democracy is also promoted through additional PSHE lessons and assemblies.
• Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.